Utah Fishing Reports
South of I-15


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Utah Fishing Reports
South

rainbow trout logo for utah fishing
Revised 04-13-18


Links give descriptions of the lake and facilities available. Check proclamtion for details on fishing restrictions as these may not be complete.

WHIRLING DISEASE -- For waters indicated, please prevent the spread of WHIRLING DISEASE by cleaning mud from waders and equipment. DO NOT TRANSPORT any parts of fish caught here to other waters. Click here for DWR information.

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY -- For more information on individual lakes and fish species: Click here for DWR information.

Abajo Mountain

Northern Pike, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Baker Reservoir

Crayfish, Brown Trout, Green Sunfish, Rainbow Trout

(Apr 6) The reservoir is full and catchable-sized rainbow trout have been stocked. Anglers report mixed fishing success.

(Mar 22) The reservoir is full, and catchable-sized rainbow trout have been stocked. Anglers have shared mixed reports of fishing success. Some large brown trout are present and can be more readily caught during the colder months.

Beaver Mountain Lakes

Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Beaver River

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout

STOP WHIRLING DISEASE

(Apr 6) The water flow is low and clear, so tread lightly to avoid spooking fish.

Regulations

Benches Pond Reservoir

Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Regulations

Boulder Mountain Lakes

Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Regulations

Boulger Reservoir

Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Regulations

Box Creek Reservoirs

Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Clear Creek

Rainbow Trout

(Mar 22) Bonneville cutthroat trout are abundant throughout Clear Creek and its tributaries. Anglers report good fishing for cutthroat — up to 11 inches long — with various flies, including streamers, nymphs and dries. Fish are actively feeding in the open, even on stormy days, which makes sight fishing a blast. There are low water levels, so you have to be a little sneaky to avoid spooking the fish.

Cleveland Reservoir

Rainbow Trout

(Apr 6) Cleveland Reservoir has about 18 inches of solid ice, but the ice is currently buried beneath about two feet of snow and slush. Anglers have had lots of success catching rainbow trout using tube jigs tipped with mealworms. Fishing is best before noon.

East Fork of Sevier River

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Rainbow Trout

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Apr 6) The water flow is under 20 cfs. Flows are a little murky, but are still fishable. Early spring is a great time to fish the river before irrigation flows increase. Call the Circle Valley Anglers fly shop at 435-577-2168 for up-to-date conditions and fishing reports.

Regulations

Enterprise Reservoirs

Rainbow Trout, Smallmouth Bass

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Mar 22) Ice is gone from both reservoirs. The lower reservoir is mostly full, while the upper is about half full. The water level is still below the boat ramp at the upper reservoir, so only small boats can be launched. Catchable-sized rainbow trout have been stocked in the lower reservoir. Early spring is a good time to target rainbows before the water level drops and algae blooms start.

Fish Lake

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Mackinaw (Lake Trout), Splake (hybrid), Rainbow Trout, Yellow Perch

STOP WHIRLING DISEASE

(Apr 6) Although the 2018 Fish Lake Perch Tournament was cancelled, you still have a chance to win a prize. If you catch a tagged perch take it to the Lakeside Marina Store and you will be entered into a drawing that will take place at the end of the summer. Ice conditions can change daily because of the variable weather. We recommend calling Fish Lake Resorts at 435-638-1000 before you go out to check on conditions. The ice is starting to soften, so use caution.

(Mar 22) Although the 2018 Fish Lake Perch Tournament was canceled, you still have a chance to win a prize. If you catch a tagged perch, take it to the Lakeside Marina Store and you will be entered into a drawing that will take place at the end of the summer. Ice conditions can change daily due to variable weather. Before you head to the lake, we recommend calling Fish Lake Resorts at 435-638-1000 to check on current ice conditions. The ice varies from 6 to 16 inches thick. Fishing for perch is good on the bottom in 12 to 30 feet of water. Use small jigs and ice flies tipped with nightcrawlers, mealworms or perch meat. Small trout can be picked up in the same area with the same technique. Use larger jigs or fish a few feet off the bottom to target trout and avoid perch. For larger trout, fish on the bottom in 20 to 30 feet of water or suspended at 15 to 20 feet over deeper water. Ice fishing is one of the best ways to target lake trout in deep water, but only go out where you know the ice is safe. Fish on the bottom in 70 to 95 feet of water with large jigs or spoons tipped with chub, sucker or perch meat. A fish finder is key to finding lake trout, reacting to their activity and enticing a strike.

Regulations

Forsyth Reservoir

Rainbow Trout, Splake (hybrid), Tiger Trout (hybrid)

STOP WHIRLING DISEASE

(Apr 6) The ice is coming off quickly and one windy day could make the rest disappear. Fishing is fair to good in the open water. Shore anglers are catching tiger and splake trout on nighcrawlers, jigs and Gulp minnows. Fly anglers are catching tiger trout on streamers from pontoons. Anglers catch most fish near the bottom.

(Mar 22) Although the 2018 Fish Lake Perch Tournament was canceled, you still have a chance to win a prize. If you catch a tagged perch, take it to the Lakeside Marina Store and you will be entered into a drawing that will take place at the end of the summer. Ice conditions can change daily due to variable weather. Before you head to the lake, we recommend calling Fish Lake Resorts at 435-638-1000 to check on current ice conditions. The ice varies from 6 to 16 inches thick. Fishing for perch is good on the bottom in 12 to 30 feet of water. Use small jigs and ice flies tipped with nightcrawlers, mealworms or perch meat. Small trout can be picked up in the same area with the same technique. Use larger jigs or fish a few feet off the bottom to target trout and avoid perch. For larger trout, fish on the bottom in 20 to 30 feet of water or suspended at 15 to 20 feet over deeper water. Ice fishing is one of the best ways to target lake trout in deep water, but only go out where you know the ice is safe. Fish on the bottom in 70 to 95 feet of water with large jigs or spoons tipped with chub, sucker or perch meat. A fish finder is key to finding lake trout, reacting to their activity and enticing a strike.

Fremont River

Rainbow Trout

STOP WHIRLING DISEASE

No recent reports.

Gunlock Reservoir

Bluegill, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Green Sunfish, Largemouth Bass

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Apr 6) The boat ramp is open during daylight hours on weekends. Visit stateparks.utah.gov for open hours. Gunlock Reservoir was treated with rotenone in 2015 to remove illegally introduced smallmouth bass. These bass pose a serious threat to native fish in the Virgin and Santa Clara rivers. We have begun re-stocking largemouth bass, bluegill and crappie. Small largemouth bass (up to 10 inches) are now abundant and can provide some fun fishing.

(Mar 22) Gunnison Bend and DMAD reservoirs are ice free. Fishing is fair to good for a variety of species.

(Mar 22) The boat ramp is closed until April 1, but it is possible to launch kayaks and float tubes from shore. Gunlock Reservoir was treated with rotenone in 2015 to remove the illegally introduced smallmouth bass that posed a serious threat to native fish in the Virgin and Santa Clara rivers. We have begun re-stocking largemouth bass, bluegill and crappie. Small largemouth bass (up to 10 inches) are now abundant and can provide some fun action. The water is still chilly, so bass are fairly lethargic. See the Sand Hollow Reservoir report for cold-weather bass techniques.

(Mar 22) The boat ramp is closed until April 1, but it is possible to launch kayaks and float tubes from shore. Gunlock Reservoir was treated with rotenone in 2015 to remove the illegally introduced smallmouth bass that posed a serious threat to native fish in the Virgin and Santa Clara rivers. We have begun re-stocking largemouth bass, bluegill and crappie. Small largemouth bass (up to 10 inches) are now abundant and can provide some fun action. The water is still chilly, so bass are fairly lethargic. See the Sand Hollow Reservoir report for cold-weather bass techniques.

Regulations

Gunnison Bend Reservoir

Catfish, Largemouth Bass, White Bass

(Apr 6) Largemouth bass are becoming more active with the rising water level and temperature.

Kolob Reservoir

Brook Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Regulations

Koosharem Reservoir

Rainbow Trout

(Apr 6) The ice is off. Fishing has been slow, but you can catch a large fish if you put in some time. Spring is one of the best times to fish at Koosharem.

(Mar 22) The ice is off. Fishing has been slow, but there is an opportunity to catch a large fish if you put in some time. Spring is one of the best times to fish here.

Lake Powell

Bluegill, Brown Trout, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike, Smallmouth Bass, Striped Bass, Rainbow Trout, Walleye

STOP QUAGGAG MUSCLE

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Apr 13) Lake elevation: 3,611 feet Water temperatures: 56–62°F

Based on last week's extreme water clarity, we went further uplake to see what conditions prevailed. We found crystal clear in Llewellyn Gulch and Cottonwood Canyon with 25 feet of visibility at the mouth of both canyons. As we went further back in the canyon, the water clarity declined to about 15 feet. We went up the San Juan and found clear water as well, to the extreme found in the main channel canyons. In Piute and Neskahi, water clarity was about 15 feet. It is likely that water clarity will decrease as water temperature warms and runoff begins.

Right now, you are more likely to catch fish in canyon areas where the water clarity is less than 15 feet or you can fish bait at depths greater than 30 feet. You can catch more fish during the early morning or late evening when the direct sunlight is blocked by high canyon walls.

Smallmouth bass were active and healthy in all of the canyons we sampled. The water temperature on our trip ranged from 56–62°F, which is ideal for prespawn bass activity. We saw only one fresh bass nest on our trip, and it appeared to be very recently fanned. Bass spawning is imminent, though, and you can expect to begin within the next week at a water temperature between 60°F and 66°F. Sight fishing for bedding bass will peak from April 18–25. Expect to find bass spawning beds in three feet of water in small-sized rocky areas rather than on sandy substrate. Largemouth beds will be in the same locations, but near a bush, overhang or stickup.

A wide range of bass baits worked well for us, including Senkos, Ned rigs, double-tailed grubs, Chatterbaits and shad-shaped worms. Long casts were more effective than dropping the bait near the fish we saw swimming near the boat. It was fun to watch bass look at and interact with the bait before they turned away. It was possible to watch how bass respond to our lures and learn from that moment.

We didn't see many stripers as they seem to be moving from the locations they occupied over the winter. Those fishing with anchovies in the main channel caught slightly more fish than during the previous week. Healthy, robust stripers that are going to spawn this year are heading to their prespawn locations where they will wait for the rapid warming that triggers spawning. Spawning usually begins around May 10 and may continue until the first week of June. Spawning fish do not feed on shad, but will eat plankton. This is an ideal time to catch big stripers on small lures or flies. Fly fishing for stripers peaks in May.

We did not catch walleye on this trip because we did not deploy bottom bouncers or tip our bass baits with a piece of nightcrawler. The walleye catch will increase each week from now until the end of May. Try to slow down and maintain bottom contact with you favorite walleye lure. I find that tipping a bass jig with a one-inch chunk of bait makes me fish slower and target walleye instead of bass. Walleye are numerous and willing to hit baits that enter their holding zone on main channel points and ledges. Fish for them in low light for best results. The ideal spot is a wind or wave induced mud line that covers the clear water and gives walleye a sense of security while they wait for food to swim by.

Spring is here. It is time to go fishing for warmwater fish.

(Apr 6) Lake elevation: 3,612 feet Water temperatures: 52–58°F

The warming trend faltered this past week and afternoon water temperatures dropped slightly from 60 degrees down to 57 while early morning temps were still in the low 50s. Cooling slowed down bass that were starting to build spawning beds. Bass will move back up and fan some more rocks later this week as the next warming trend arrives.

It was surprising to see the impact of cooling daytime water temperatures, dropping lake levels, combined with the presence of quagga mussels as visibility in the lake became clearer than ever witnessed in my long career. We fished for bass in Friendship Cove only to find an aquatic petting zoo where the lake bottom could be seen at 25 feet throughout the entire cove. Bass and other fish were seen swimming under the boat but few were caught due to water clarity. My advice is to spend more time fishing for bass in deeper water (25 to 30 feet) or in canyons where visibility is 15 feet of less. In clear water, throw very long casts to prevent fish from seeing the boat before they have a chance to see the lure. Recently, under the declining full moon, the very best bass fishing success was from 5 pm to dark when shadows were on the water. That is the warmest water of the day with water clarity reduced by shadows.

Walleye fishing has started in the northern lake. One party captured 50 walleye over the past weekend fishing near Good Hope Bay. Their technique was to cast Gulp minnows and Keitech swimbaits on 3/16 ounce jig heads on main lake points where bottom depth was 10 to 15 feet. The lures had to be retrieved very slowly for best results. Expect walleye action to improve lakewide, each week through the rest of April and May.

Some crappie have been caught over the length of the lake. They will be near a sunken bush or holding by an old cottonwood tree trunk. Brush is not abundant so it takes a lot of searching to find where they hangout. More crappie are caught in the mid and northern lake.

Clear water is not a problem in the northern lake where runoff is starting to muddy the water from Hite down to the Horn. The channel is getting muddy but the backs of the canyons (White, Trachyte, Scorup, etc.) remain green with good fishing for bass, walleye and stripers.

Bait fishing is working now in the southern lake with stripers reportedly caught at the dam, power plant intake and on the first left turn after passing buoy 3 while heading up lake. Number of stripers caught is not as many as last year when 20 or more fish were caught per boat. This year the average catch is 10 fish or less. It is important to be in the right spot where many fish can be caught while 20 yards away from the good spot no fish are caught. Move around from spot to spot until the boat is centered over a school for best results.

I still go uplake and troll for stripers along the breaking edge of the shoreline where water depth changes quickly from 20 feet to 50 feet. Stripers can see and feel the trolled lure in the clear water and come up from 40-50 feet to hit the lure at 10 feet. It is wise in the clear water to troll the lure at 200 feet or further to let the fish forget about the boat before seeing the lure. This is more important in the southern clear lake than in the north where water clarity is less than 10 feet.

In the south, stripers are schooling in clear water along the main channel and in the murky water at the backs of canyons. The schools are now large, tight and easy to see on the graph instead of scattered in small bunches as they were over winter. Once located, they can be caught by casting crankbaits, jigs, and spoons to their holding location. More fish can be caught on lures uplake than on bait near the main channel.

Expect fishing success to improve with warm weather and falter as the wind and cool temperatures return. Watch the weather reports that are fairly accurate for about 10 days out. Go fishing on the best weather days during April, when possible, to have the best success on your trip.

(Mar 31) Lake elevation: 3,612.74 feet Water temperatures: 50–56°F

Many people are wondering if stripers have moved into the main channel and are readily responding to anchovy bait. Reports have been few, so I made the early morning trek to the dam to get a first hand report. It was cold and breezy and the boat near the buoy line had been there for an hour without success. It was reported that they caught 5 fish yesterday. When stripers are abundant the average catch is 20 fish or more per boat. So far this spring, numbers of stripers caught in the main channel have been few. Further investigation took me to Buoy 3, Power Plant intake, and Buoy 9 with similar negative results. Bait fishing gets better as the water warms but there are more stripers in the backs of canyons. The best reports have been coming from Navajo, Gunsight, Last Chance and Rock Creek.

Josh Smith of Page AZ with a winter striper caught in Warm Creek.

Photo courtesy of Wayne Gustaveson

There was a major discover with travel further uplake. Last week the hot spots were in colored water in the backs of canyons and the bite improved with warming. This week the water temperature was still 50 degrees in the morning but it warmed quickly to 56 in the afternoon. Fish response was surprising as stripers could be caught in crystal clear water trolling and spooning. Trolling along the shoreline from Face Canyon to Gregory Butte and from West Canyon to Dove Canyon produced a great catch of 2-3 pound stripers.

If trolling, avoid the steep cliff walls with deep water near shore. Instead look for rocky points and humps and troll along the breaking edge where depth quickly changes from visible rock to deep water. Surprisingly, the water visibility was over 25 feet. I saw fish on the graph at 25 feet and looked over the side of the boat and saw the actual fish. Of course, they could see me as well so the visit was short. The positive result of clear water is that stripers holding at 40-50 feet could see our trolled lures trolled at 12 feet and come up quickly to investigate. The Buoy 25 cove is like a nature observatory where stripers can be seen swimming at depth on some days.

While trolling, watch the graph for striper schools holding on the bottom or swimming suspended under the boat. If the school is suspended just keep trolling because the deep fish are likely to come up and hit the shallow trolled lures. If the school is resting on the bottom (30 to 50 feet) then toss out a floating marker or hit the waypoint on the graph so you can return to the resting school and try spoons dropped right into the school. Both of these techniques worked well on this trip.

Fishing success has increased significantly this week. Warming is still the trigger to watch. Expect water temperature to rise this week so it is important to note early morning temperature as you leave the dock and then expect fishing success to improve as the water warms 3 degrees or more.

Fishing for bass is improving as well. On this trip a white grub tossed into clear water of a dry wash stream channel framed between two high cliff walls resulted in the catch of a 2.5 pound smallmouth bass and some smaller bass. Bass are becoming more active and will be hiding in brushy cover for largemouth and rocky cover for smallmouth. Bass were not caught trolling but were more likely to respond to plastic baits fished on bottom near rocky points and brush. It is necessary to throw long casts in clear water while short casts can be effective in murky water in the backs of canyons.

Expect bass to come shallow and start fanning nests next week if the weather continues to warm. If it stays cold then nest building will be postponed a week or two. Historically bass spawning begins the third week of April but nest building starts as early as the first week of April.

Walleye have not turned on yet as they need another week or two to complete the spawning process. Expect walleye fishing to improve dramatically mid April. Bluegill and catfish will spawn in May and June.

Spring is here. It’s time for anglers to come and enjoy great fishing and beat the summer crowds.

(Mar 22) Lake elevation: 3,613.6 feet Water temperatures: 50-54°F

The water temperature today (49.6 F) was essentially the same as last week. Therefore, it seemed the results of our weekly trip would be similar to last week while fishing in the back of a major canyon with cloudy water to find active cooperative fish. The choices heading upstream from Wahweap included, Warm Creek, Navajo, Gunsight, Last Chance, West Canyon, and Rock Creek. All have been moderately productive recently.

The first stop was in deep water (90 feet) where a few fish traces were seen holding tight to the bottom. Spoons were deployed and one was bumped but no fish were caught, so we moved on. Few fish were seen on the graph at bottom depth of 50-80 feet. We then moved to the back of the canyon trolling the shoreline rocky points with Lucky Craft XD pointers in chartreuse shad and ghost colors. Catching was slow until we crossed one rocky point where the water depth changed quickly from 40 to 25 feet. A striper school was graphed on top of the shallow ridge with two quick hookups as our lures crossed the ridge. The school followed the two hooked fish so spoons were dropped and more fish were caught. After that fishing was again slow as the school left the ridge and did not return. For the rest of the morning a few random stripers were caught trolling with the most productive bottom depth being 20-30 feet. After lunch 2 anglers had 15 stripers in the ice chest. Two more side canyons were trolled after lunch without success except for one random walleye caught trolling. It seemed we might as well return to Wahweap.

We returned to the first spot to tell some friends that we were returning to Wahweap. They looked at us like we were crazy. We took the hint and tried fishing the back of the canyon once more with completely different results. Stripers hit trolled lures with aggression. If the school was on the bottom, spoons were whacked with passion. When one fish was reeled in the whole school followed and more fish could be caught by casting lures in any direction. After each fish was landed we just glanced at the graph to see where the school was holding and at what depth before choosing which lure to use next. In the next hour our catch increased to 40 stripers.

What was the difference? The water temperature increased from 50 in the morning to 53 in the afternoon. Warming caused a complete change in attitude from the same fish. Temperature increase to 53 is the first hurdle but a larger increase to 57 and above is the key to catching warm water fish in the springtime.

Back at the fish cleaning station the walleye was examined and found to be prespawn. The walleye spawn is not yet over so do not expect walleye catching to pick up until mid April.

Other anglers at the cleaning station reported good afternoon fishing in Navajo and Warm Creek where stripers were caught trolling in murky water at the back of the canyon. I was glad to hear that smallmouth bass were caught in good numbers on Yamamoto creature baits in clear water coves in Navajo. There was also a second hand report that bait fishermen had caught stripers at the dam over the weekend.

In summary, fishing results improve dramatically as the water temperature increases each day. Catching is usually better in the afternoon than morning or mid day. Water warms first on the surface so fish tend to go shallower when seeking warmth and feeding opportunities. Expect fish movement as the day progresses. Expect better results by fishing in the backs of canyons in greenish gray colored water rather than in clear, deep water of main channel and bays. The fish caught had empty stomachs except for smaller stripers that were eating plankton in open water. Fish that we caught remembered what shad looked like as they ate our lures. Bait fishing is probably working well but was not tried on this trip.

Regulations

Lower Bowns

Rainbow Trout

(Mar 22) The ice is off. Access is limited to high-clearance and four-wheel-drive vehicles due to snow and mud. There haven't been any recent reports of fishing success.

Mill Meadow Reservoir

Brake (hybrid), Brownbows (hybrid), Perch, Rainbow, Splake (hybrid), Tiger Musky (hybrid), Tiger Trout (hybrid)

STOP WHIRLING DISEASE

(Apr 6) The ice is coming off and there is a lot of open water to fish, especially at the inlets. Fair to good fishing reported for rainbow and brown trout in the open water.

(Mar 22) The ice is coming off and there is a lot of open water to fish, especially at the inlets. Anglers report fair to good fishing for rainbow and brown trout in the open water.

Regulations

Minersville Reservoir

Rainbow Trout, Smallmouth Bass

STOP WHIRLING DISEASE

(Apr 6) Fishing has been slow to fair — because trout have been focused on spawning — but seems to be picking up. Anglers have caught some very nice-sized fish recently. Midges and nymphs have been producing better than streamers. We conducted our annual fish population survey recently and found good numbers of rainbow trout from 16 to 22 inches. These larger fish are in great condition and are very fat. The rainbows stocked last fall also experienced good survival. The results are encouraging, despite the poor water level in recent years. Utah chub numbers have been severely reduced by wipers. This is reducing competition with trout and leading to better growth and survival.

(Mar 22) The ice is off, and the water temperature is in the mid-40s. Fishing is slow to fair, as trout are not very hungry and starting to focus on spawning. Some very nice fish have been caught lately, however. We conducted our annual fish population survey this week and found good numbers of rainbow trout from 16 to 22 inches. These larger fish are in great condition and very fat. Rainbows stocked last fall also experienced good survival. The survey results were encouraging, despite poor water levels in recent years. Utah chub numbers have been severely reduced by wipers. Fewer chub in the reservoir has led to better growth and survival for the trout.

Regulations

Navajo Lake

Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Newcastle Reservoir

Smallmouth Bass, Rainbow Trout, Wiper (hybrid)

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Apr 6) Fishing has been slow. That is likely because the healthy trout isn't hungry and is focused on spawning. Look for fishing to improve as the water temperatures warm in the next month. We conducted a fish population survey and found great results for rainbow trout. The rainbows stocked last fall are abundant and have grown up to 10 to 12 inches. We also found a fair number of larger rainbows, up to 20 inches. These fish are in great condition and seem to be growing well — despite the low water levels in recent years.

(Mar 22) The ice is gone, and the water temperature is in the mid 40s. Fishing has been slow, but that is likely due to healthy trout that are not hungry and starting to focus on spawning. Look for fishing to improve as water temperatures warm in the next month. We conducted a fish population survey this week and found great results for rainbow trout. Rainbows stocked last fall are abundant and have grown up to 10-12 inches. We also found a fair number of larger rainbows, up to 20 inches long. These fish are in great condition and seem to be growing well, despite low water levels in recent years.

Regulations

Otter Creek Reservoir

Rainbow Trout

STOP WHIRLING DISEASE

(Apr 6) The reservoir is filling and is up to 82 percent of capacity. Fishing for trout has been slow to fair because of the cold water temperature and the fish focusing on spawning. Look for fishing to pick up over the next week or so as the water starts to warm and rainbow trout start to feed after the spawn. Anglers experience the highest catch rates of the year during April, so plan your trip soon.

(Mar 22) The reservoir is ice-free and filling. Fishing is slow to fair due to cold water temperatures and a focus on spawning. Fishing success will pick up in April when the water starts to warm and rainbow trout start to feed after the spawn.

Regulations

Panguitch Lake

Brook Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout, Tiger Trout (hybrid)

(Apr 6) The ice broke up and blew off during the last week. Don't fret over missing ice-off, however, because we typically see good fishing for at least a month after the ice disappears. In fact, the big fish seem to get a little more active as the water starts to warm. Fishing is fair to good. Rainbow trout are feeding fairly actively, so you can readily catch them using a fly or bait. You can catch cutthroat and tiger trout using tube jigs and swim baits tipped with cut bait.

(Mar 22) The ice is starting to soften up and could become dangerous after forecasted rain this week. Look for open water fishing in the next few weeks.

Regulations

Paragonah Reservoir

Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Regulations

Pine Lake

Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Pine Valley Reservoir

Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Regulations

Quail Creek Reservoir

Bluegill, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Apr 6) Catchable-sized rainbow trout have been stocked and are providing good fishing from the shore or a boat. Look for bass activity to pick up in April.

(Mar 22) Catchable-sized rainbow trout have been stocked and are providing good fishing from boats and the shore. See the Sand Hollow report for cold-weather bass fishing tips.

Regulations

Redmond Reservoir

Catfish, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike

No recent reports.

Sand Cove Reservoirs

Green Sunfish, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Sand Hollow Reservoir

Bluegill, Largemouth Bass

STOP QUAGGAG MUSCLE

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Apr 6) Spring fishing at Sand Hollow is always a rollercoaster ride because of the variable weather. When the weather warms the water to 60°F mark, the bass start to get active at depths of 10 to 20 feet. Anglers have seen a few bass moving into the shallows, but the mass migration really hasn't started yet. Fishing has been good to excellent during these warm periods. It's still best to use cold water techniques — spinnerbaits, finesse baits like Senkos, drop shot rigs and shaky heads — with a slow presentation. Cold fronts and storms shut everything down while the water temperature drops and bass close their mouths. It usually takes two or three warms days in a row to get the temperature back up and the bass active again. Watch the weather report and plan accordingly.

(Apr 6) Spring fishing at Sand Hollow is always a rollercoaster ride because of the variable weather. When the weather warms the water to 60°F mark, the bass start to get active at depths of 10 to 20 feet. Anglers have seen a few bass moving into the shallows, but the mass migration really hasn't started yet. Fishing has been good to excellent during these warm periods. It's still best to use cold water techniques — spinnerbaits, finesse baits like Senkos, drop shot rigs and shaky heads — with a slow presentation. Cold fronts and storms shut everything down while the water temperature drops and bass close their mouths. It usually takes two or three warms days in a row to get the temperature back up and the bass active again. Watch the weather report and plan accordingly.

(Mar 22) Bass activity slows down as the water cools in the winter, but a few nice fish are still picked up every year during the colder months. The keys are to fish deep (20 to 30 feet down) and use a slow presentation. Finesse baits like Senkos, drop shot rigs and shaky heads are very conducive to a slow presentation. Slow-rolling spinnerbaits can also be very effective.

Regulations

Thousand Lakes Mountain

Trout

No recent reports.

Tropic Reservoir

Rainbow Trout

No recent reports.

Wide Hollow Reservoir

Bluegill, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout

(Mar 22) The reservoir is ice-free and filling. Rainbow trout have been stocked and should provide fair to good fishing. We began introducing black crappie in 2017 in order to establish a new population for anglers to target. If you catch any crappie, we request that you release them so that they can spawn this spring.

Willow Lake

Rainbow Trout, Tiger Trout (hybrid)

No recent reports.

Yankee Meadow Reservoir

Brook Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout

(Mar 22) Snow is making it difficult to access the reservoir — you may need an ATV or snowmobile. The ice is 8 to 10 inches thick. Anglers report fair to good fishing if you can make it to the reservoir.

Regulations









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